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Get a Ham Radio Vanity Call Sign!

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As soon as I got my Amateur Radio Extra Class License, I started my search for my very own vanity call sign!  There are a few easy steps to get your own vanity call sign.  You can pay someone else $40+ to apply for it… or you can do it yourself for $21 on the internet!

You will have to determine what combination of prefix, call area, and suffix you might want, or what will fit your specific letters into it.  I wanted to have “WV” somewhere in my call to represent the state of West Virginia (you can use your initials, etc.)… prefix or suffix.  I needed an “8” for my call area… but that is no longer mandatory.  As for a prefix, I wanted to be a little different than the standard K, N, A or W so that it would stand out during a contest and sound neat.  Something that sounded cool when announced phonetically and that wasn’t too difficult to send with Morse Code.  So I focused on a prefix combination starting with an A or W.

All the 1 X 2 call signs with a “WV” were already taken… N8WV, K8WV, W8WV, A8WV.

RadioQTHLinks

So I decided I would use a 2 X 2 call sign.  I wrote down some possibilities that I thought would be cool… WT8WV, AF8WV, etc.  I had about 8 different ones to check out on the RadioQTH webite… just type it in and hit enter!  Is it available?  If so, write it down in a list of call signs available to submit to the FCC!  (More on this in a minute.)  First, go to this website http://www.radioqth.net/lookup and search to see if the vanity call sign you would like to have is available.  You will simply type in the call sign and it will tell you if someone else already owns it, or not.

You can also use the QRZ website… http://www.qrz.com/

You can also use the FCC ULS look up…  http://wireless2.fcc.gov/UlsApp/UlsSearch/searchLicense.jsp

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Now… once you have a list of call signs you can live with… you will need to put them in the order of your preferences, so they can be added to the FCC Form you will use to apply.

You will need your FCC issued FRN number off of your current Amateur Radio license to apply.  If you don’t have your FRN handy, just search for your existing call sign and it will be displayed in the form.  Copy it to your clipboard or write it down.

Go to this FCC web page and READ the directions.  http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/index.htm?job=cft&id=amateur&page=cft_get_call_sign

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It’s not hard and after reading the instructions you will go to this new web page to pay for and apply for the vanity call sign online.  You will need to register…  http://wireless.fcc.gov/uls/index.htm?job=home

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Once you register you will arrange to pay the FCC their money, fill out their form, add your list of preferred vanity call signs, finish the form and submit it.  You can check back daily to see if it has been issued.  It will be in a PENDING status while the FCC does their own search.  In about 18 days (Yes, I looked this up on the internet to see how long it takes… mine took… wait for it… 18 days.), you will know which of your preferred call signs has been assigned to you.  If you did your call sign search well, you will probably get your first preference!  You just saved yourself at least $20 by doing it yourself.

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How can you become a Ham Radio operator QUICKLY?

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You won’t believe how easy it can be!  You take it in bite-size chunks of information and at your own pace.  NO MORE MORSE CODE REQUIREMENT!  (But Morse Code is a blast to still use and also the most efficient form of radio communication!  I had to be able to send and receive 5 words per minute for the old Novice License… 13 wpm for General Class… and 20 wpm for Advanced and Extra Class licenses.  There are no longer any Morse Code requirements and the Novice and Advanced Class licenses are no longer available.)  For more than 100 years ham radio operators have been exploring the world and beyond from their own little ham shacks / ham station / living rooms.  It never gets old and there is always something to explore!

What can you do with a ham radio?  Talk to people all over the world with as little as 1 watt or less… or even 1500 watts.  Assist in Emergency Communications.  Assist with branches of the US Armed Forces.  Build your own radios and equipment.  Experiment with your own antennas.  Go to fun “Hamfests and Flea Markets” to learn and get great bargains.  Find new friends who are hams in your local club.  Participate in the Annual ARRL Field Day Contest and exercises!  Talk to the astronauts on the International Space Station.  Talk to other hams around the world THROUGH many ham radio satellites orbiting the earth!  Use your local VHF/UHF Repeaters to talk to family and friends from the car, handheld radio or from home.  Track ham radio equipped balloon flights.  Work with hams with disabilities.  Refurbish or collect old time ham radio equipment.  Teach others ham radio courses and/or help with exam sessions.

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There are three different licenses you can obtain and they are designed in a way that as you study to get the first license, what you learn there will help you understand the next license study material.  The really nice thing about it is that you will have ALL the multiple choice questions in each exam pool AND THE EXACT ANSWER TO EVERY QUESTION!  That’s pretty good to have all the Q’s and A’s to study!  The sample questions in your study materials are the EXACT questions you will see on the exam.  A score of 74% gets you the license!  There are also FREE practice exams you can take online or even from your smartphone!  (I took a couple practice exams each evening as I sat watching TV in my favorite chair in my living room.)  Soon the questions you have missed in the past practice exams are embedded in your brain with the correct answers reinforced!  Each question will have four (4) possible answers; and on most of the questions you can just about eliminate two of the possible answers just by looking at them.  (I will give you some good pointers about how to study and prepare for the exams at the end of this post!  Read them before you buy any study guides or books!)

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You will just need to do some interesting and fun reading, look at the questions (and the exact answers) from each chapter of the book… and before you know it you will be ready to take the exam!  You are going to learn some really cool stuff each time you read the material.  PLUS, as you advance to a higher class of Ham Radio license you can pick your own call sign!  (In the early 1980’s my first call sign was KA8LJO from the FCC as a Novice Class licensee… then I was assigned KB8FIR by the FCC when I got my Technician Class license… and better yet, when I got my Extra Class license I picked my own call sign, WT8WV… “Whiskey Tango 8 Whiskey Victor”.  I chose it for three reasons… I am fond of an occasional taste of good whiskey… I love my state of West Virginia… and phonetically it stands out and sings in a pile-up during a Ham Radio contest!)

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The first license you study for is called the Technician License and the exam has only 35 questions!  You will learn some very basic things about electricity, how your radio signals move through the air, some of the rules that the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) expects us to abide by for best practices, antennas, radios, the frequencies you can use in your new radio, and much more!  You will gain legal access to some very good frequencies for both voice and data communication in several excellent ham bands.  You could be ready to take this exam in a couple weeks of study!

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The second license is called the General Class License and also has only 35 questions.  This course adds to what you learned in the Technician Class study.  It really dives just a bit deeper into some common things you will find will help you get more out of your antenna, radios, contesting, which ham bands magically open at specific periods of the day and year, some simply explanations of a few electronic circuits we use every day, and much more!  You will also gain even MORE frequencies on the ham bands to use at your pleasure!  You could be ready to take this exam in 2-4 weeks of easy study!

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The third (and highest class of Ham Radio license) is called the Extra Class License and consists of a 50 question exam.  This study course really dives deeper in what you have learned in the Technician and General Class license preparations.  It will take a bit more time to study and prepare, and has a few more questions on the exam.  You gain ALL frequencies allotted to Ham Radio communications, with several excellent niches within certain ham bands reserved for ONLY Extra Class licensees!  You could be ready to take this exam in 30-60 days with some good study and practice exams under your belt!

ARRL-Logo

The Amateur Radio Relay League (ARRL) also offers all sorts of study books for not only all the licenses but a myriad of way cool ham related stuff for every facet of this vast hobby!  I have been a member of the ARRL for years and the monthly QST magazine alone is worth my dues!  Plus you get discounts on all the other books and items.  You can even find a local ham radio license class!  http://www.arrl.org/find-an-amateur-radio-license-class  Here is a link to the ARRL study guides for the three licenses.  They are much more in-depth than the Gordon West series of license books and a good addition to your study… but I personally feel the Gordon West series in the best way to get that license quickly.  Below for more information.   http://www.arrl.org/ham-radio-license-manual

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License Exam Study and Preparation Tips

Select which study book you will use for the license you are going to test for.

Find a quiet place to read.

Have a yellow highlighter handy to highlight things you might need to refer to for a question.

Study about 20 minutes a day.  That way you won’t overload your brain!

Download a smartphone app with the ham radio practice exam questions and answers.  I used this all the time whenever I had to wait around for something or someone… or in a boring meeting (once in a while).

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.iversoft.ham.test.prep&hl=en

Watch free YouTube videos to help you prepare or further understand the chapter.  I have watched all of Dave Casler’s YouTube videos and they were a tremendous help to UNDERSTAND not just the question but the concept for every ham license book.  He does each video by chapter or topic and they a short enough to consume in a sitting.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEWmiMotimY&list=PL07A7D1C9D7BF7F48

I highly recommend the Gordon West Technician Class License Value Pack for getting your Technician License quickly!  I don’t get paid for saying this!  Grin.  However, I will tell your this is the best investment in getting a license you can find.  Gordo makes it fun to learn and he tackles every question and answer in a way that will etch it deep in your memory.  You will absolutely burn through the questions and he’ll teach you ways to remember even the questions that seem difficult for some reason.  I have met him at the Dayton Hamvention and he’s a wonderful person and so helpful.  He even gives you his personal telephone number to call if you have a question!  I suggest burning the CD’s to an MP3 format and put them on your iPod, iPhone, Android or other device so your can listen to them anywhere… car, at lunch, on the treadmill, working out, hiking, etc.  Worked for me every time I did my 30 minutes on the treadmill and lifting weights!  (After I completed my Extra Class license with his book and CD’s I sold them for half-price to another General License ham in our club who is now studying with them!  You could recoup some of your cost, too!)

http://www.w5yi.org/catalog_details.php?pid=78&sort=4

I highly recommend the Gordon West General Class License Value Pack for getting your General Class License quickly!  http://www.w5yi.org/catalog_details.php?pid=59&sort=4

I highly recommend the Gordon West Extra Class License Value Pack for getting your Extra Class License quickly!  http://www.w5yi.org/catalog_details.php?pid=43&sort=4

Practice Exams, Practice Exams, Practice Exams, Practice Exams, Practice Exams!

These are free and a good way to see what areas you need to focus on so you can master a question.  I did this about every evening during commercials watching TV!  Great feedback on how you are progressing in your studies.  When you begin scoring 80% on these practice exams you will be ready to sit for an exam!  (If you buy the ARRL study books, they come with a CD with all the questions in the pool, the answers, scores your exams, shows you the areas you need to focus on, and tracks your progress by each section of the question pool.)  

http://www.eham.net/exams/

Getting you Ham Radio License is NOT rocket science… but it will be fun!  It’s a hobby that is ageless.  What happens if the cellphone towers don’t work, or if there is a prolonged power outage, or a natural disaster prevents normal communications?  Ham radio operators are often the first folks getting the word out and getting the help coming in!  I doesn’t have to be an expensive hobby, either!  I have pieces of equipment I have either built myself or purchased dirt cheap at a flea market.  I have also saved my money for some other items in my ham shack.  It’s also a fun hobby to share with family, friends, and associates worldwide!  GET ON THE AIR!       

Click on picture below to enlarge it so you can see the frequency privileges you get with each license!

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Heil Pro 7 Headset from 2015 Dayton Hamvention

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Having lost a signification amount of higher frequencies in my hearing over the years, I added this to my WT8WV station. Bob Heil spent a few minutes with me on how to set them up with my Icom 761. He’s a great fella! Can’t wait to get them on the air!

The Pro 7 offers a feature set that compliments the Heil Sound standard for headset design. Unlike copies of various aviation type headsets, the PRO 7 is not a copy. It brings newtechnologyto the headset industry. The 2″ thick gel foam ear pads provide extreme comfort for extended periods of time while exhibiting passive noise reduction rated at -26dB, ideal for use in high ambient noise environments. Using technology Bob Heil learned from Paul Klipsch back in the early 70’s, the ear cup enclosures were tuned to the free air cone resonance of the speaker cone thus providing very low distortion with maximum voice articulation providing the ultimate sound reproduction for communications. Theexclusive Heil Phase Reversal system (HPR) allows you to acoustically move the signals forward and creates a spatial widening of the sound field. This feature makes it easier to pull a weak signal from a pileup – useful for DxPeditions and contests as well as a stress reliever as your change the phase angle of the program source. A speaker balance control allows preferred level between the speakers.

The PRO 7 has interchangeable microphone system allows the microphone element to be easily changed in the field for different types of applications. The low distortion Dynamic HC-7 element exhibits a frequency response of 100 Hz – 12 kHz with the -3dB points at 100 Hz and 12 kHz. The traditional Heil speech articulation rise is centered at 2K -4KHz with properly balanced highs and lows. The impedance is 600 ohm. The HC-7 is one of our best microphone elements for speech articulation.

Designed exclusively for iCOM radios, the iC Electret element has a -3dB fixed point at 35 Hz and 12kHz with the sensitivity of-48 at 1500 ohms output centered at 1kHz. The iC element solves the problems with LOW GAIN ICOM radios but can also work with great results on newer Icom models. Bias power is applied to operate the iC electret element. The Pro 7 iC is supplied with our ADl-iC eight pin iCOM adapter cable.

The Pro 7 and Pro 7iC come in black, red, blue or pink.

The balance control located on the LEFT speaker, controls only the left speaker. Begin by setting a comfortable right side speaker level with the AF gain of the receiver. You then adjust the left side speaker where necessary to balance the audio between the speakers. In most cases the balance control will be close to or maximum.

http://www.heilsound.com/amateur/products/headsets/pro-7

Doublet Antenna to Hang!

Will be putting this baby up in the air soon!  Also have a 4:1 balun to add to it.  We use these for Field Day, as well!

Will be putting this baby up in the air soon! Also have a 4:1 balun to add to it. We use these for Field Day, as well!

2015 Dayton Hamvention Exploits

Tektronix 455... have always wanted a 'scope' to use to monitor my signals.  Got this one from a engineer who upgraded to a fancy new one.  Paid $75 for it and it works great!

Tektronix 455… have always wanted a ‘scope’ to use to monitor my signals. Got this one from a engineer who upgraded to a fancy new one. Paid $75 for it and it works great!

Bill, Tom and I decided to buy a QRP rig to play with that night while in Dayton.  So we picked this little jewel up, found an old power supply, and rigged up a dipole for some 40 Meter QRP.

Bill, Tom and I decided to buy a QRP rig to play with that night while in Dayton. So we picked this little jewel up, found an old power supply, some cheap meters and rigged up a dipole for some 40 Meter QRP.

Bill and Tom (with the assistance of my daughter's cat,

Bill and Tom (with the assistance of my daughter’s cat, “Ender”) put together the custom dipole for 40 Meters. It was strung through the kitchen and up the stairs… and it made beautiful music!

Inside the MFJ 40 Meter QRP rig... CLEAN!

Inside the MFJ 40 Meter QRP rig… CLEAN!

Picked up a cheap power supply and some $1 meters to add to our Dayton Hamvention

Picked up a cheap power supply and some $1 meters to add to our Dayton Hamvention “power house QRP station”.

Bad capacitor in power supply had to be re-soldered.

Bad capacitor in power supply had to be re-soldered.

Needed a little TLC

Needed a little TLC

Stealth antenna for QRP

Stealth antenna for QRP

Bill wiring circuits with Tom's oversight.

Bill wiring circuits with Tom’s oversight.

Bought this cute and tiny South African Special Forces Keyer to use for QRP and Straight Key Night contests.

Bought this cute and tiny South African Special Forces Keyer to use for QRP and Straight Key Night contests.

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A couple of old $1 meters

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Lighting up the FINALS! Burning holes through the clouds!

NEXT YEAR... this will be our big purchase for a tower for our weekend QRP station.  Tom gets to carry it out of the Dayton Hamvention Hara Arena to the truck.

NEXT YEAR… this will be our big purchase for a tower for our weekend QRP station. Tom gets to carry it out of the Dayton Hamvention Hara Arena to the truck.

Upgraded to Extra Class License and New Call Sign ! WT8WV

In March of 2015 I took my test for Extra Class and passed with flying colors.  I then did some searching for a unique vanity call sign that would have the letters “WV” somehow incorporated for “West Virginia” initials.  None of the 1 X 2 calls were available, so I fixated on variations of a 2 X 2 call.  I tried prefixes of W? A? K? N? followed by 8WV.  After some thought for use in a contest, I settled on a “WT” prefix since you don’t tend to hear many “WHISKEY TANGO” prefixes… soooooo…

WHISKEY TANGO 8 WHISKEY VICTOR

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A buddy of mine in the ham club said, “That’s a lot of whiskey’s…”  I told him I am fond of whiskeys and love West Virginia… hence the new call sign.  Eighteen days later the FCC granted my first choice and I retired my old call sign, “KB8FIR” and before that my original call sign from the early 1980’s was “KA8LJO”.

QRP and Tuna’s! (Two Tinned Tunas, that is…)

How to set up and operate a complete QRP ham radio station using the Two Tinned Tunas transmitter, Sudden Storm ][ receiver, and Tuna Helper T/R switch from http://qrpme.com/ 

Ham Radio Deluxe (HRD)…

I love Ham Radio Deluxe software!  It has it ALL for your hamshack!  This is serious software for the serious Ham Radio Operator.  It integrates with soooooo many other Ham softwares, rigs and rotors.

http://www.ham-radio-deluxe.com/

Radio Control

The heart of Ham Radio Deluxe, Rig Control provides a customizable interface to control your amateur transceiver using its built-in computer aided control interface. Rig Control allows you to organize buttons, sliders, and drop-downs to toggle radio options, select modes and filter settings, and control various level inputs via your computer screen. HRD Rig Control brings out features buried in a modern rig’s menus, making it easy for you to optimize your rig with a few clicks of the mouse.
Rig Control takes advantage of computer control features built in by your radio’s manufacturer. Using your interface cable, Rig Control takes control of your radio to make the most of its features. It also provides the interface for the other modules of Ham Radio Deluxe to communicate with your radio: bring mode and frequency information straight into your logbook, key your radio while using exciting digital modes, and automatically adjust for Doppler shift while “working the birds.”

Logbook

Logbook is a complete DX operations center. Beginning with a robust database engine, Ham Radio Deluxe Logbook screams operating convenience. Packed with features, Logbook is the ideal shack accessory for everyone from the novice rag-chewer to the most accomplished paper-hanger. Keep track of all important contact information with the click of a mouse. Look up name, QTH, and other important information about your contacts using a variety of online and offline sources. Interface with the popular QRZ.com call sign database (subscription required), a free look up service, or HRD’s SAM Callsign CD (sold separately.)
Logbook also interfaces with DX Spider cluster servers for spotting the rare ones. The Bandmap feature graphically displays spots within a band with up to 10 bands visible at once. With just a click of a mouse, swing your beam to the DX station’s heading. Once you have the rare DX in the log, integration with Trusted QSL makes uploading to Logbook of the World a snap! Downloading from LoTW is just as simple. In fact, Logbook interfaces with many popular electronic logbook services, including eQSL, HRDLog.net, and ClubLog. Logbook keeps track of many popular awards too. Logbook is packed with features!

Digital Master (formerly DM-780)

Digital Master, formerly “DM-780,” is the all-purpose digital communications package integrated with the Ham Radio Deluxe suite. Digital Master uses your computer’s soundcard interface and radio connection to offer a wide range of communications options to the amateur radio operator. Digital Master is capable of a wide range of digital modes, including CW, RTTY, SSTV, PSK31, MT-63, and more. For the CW enthusiast, Digital Master interfaces with the popular K1EL WinKeyer. True frequency shift keying (FSK) and audio frequency shift keying (AFSK) keying are available for RTTY operation.
You can stay on top of the action with Digital Master’s SuperSweeper, allowing you to copy up to 40 QSO’s at once in CW, RTTY or PSK. Once the QSO is complete, Digital Master interfaces directly with Logbook to record the contact. Digital Master works with a variety of audio and multimode interfaces including the Timewave Navigator, SignaLink USB, and West Mountain Radio RigBlaster.

Satellite Tracker

Ham Radio Deluxe’s Satellite Tracking module takes the guesswork out of satellite operations. Using the latest orbital mechanics equations and up-to-the-minute Keplerian element information downloaded from a variety of trusted sources, you can predict satellite passes with confidence. Customizable visualization keep you apprised of the satellite’s foot print, projected path, and predicted elevation for given passes. A real-time link to Google Earth allows one to see what the satellite “sees” as it flies overhead – great for presentations!
Real-time tracking feeds azimuth and elevation information directly to rotator control for automated positioning of satellite antenna systems. Satellite Tracking automatically calculates Doppler shift for the satellite’s transponders and sends tuning data to Rig Control, keeping your radio locked in the transponder’s passband.

Rotator Control

Integrating with Logbook and Satellite Tracking, Rotator Control manages beam headings via any computer interfaced rotator controller. Many modern control boxes such as the M2 RC2800PX, Green Heron RT-2x series, Yaesu GS-232, MDS RC-1, and HyGain DCU series controllers have computer control capability. Many more can be retrofit for computer control – why not put them to work?
Rotator Control displays a Mercator or great circle projection map that enables click-to-point rotator operation. Drop-down country lists also make it easy to find those rare DX entities: simply select the country name to point your beam and start calling. Rotator Control is the finishing touch for your station integration project.

Technical Support

HRD Software offers multiple forms of support. You can talk to a live person by calling or emailing the support department. An email opens an automatic trouble ticket which is responded to by a member of the support team. You can check also check on your Ticket Status via the Internet. Our support team may recommend a remote session using Teamviewer to ascertain where an issue may be and to fix it. There is also the option of using the Forums for peer to peer support. HRD Software has a YouTube Channel that features several videos that can be used to help configure your system.

Updated Fixes and New Features

  • Fault on connection with IP logging enabled – fixed
  • Norton 360 – fixed
  • LOTW upload and download – fixed
  • ODBC error – fixed
  • Winkey 3 Support – fixed
  • FT-1200 Support added
  • OMNI VI Support added
  • HRD Voice
  • Updated Label Maker
  • ADX Support
  • FT-767 GX II Support
  • IC-9100 Satellite Mode to use VFO B
  • WA9PIE-2 Cluster Support
  • Unicode Support
  • Improved K3 and KX3 Support
  • Flex 6700 with SmartSDR Support

  • Windows 8.1 Support
  • Yaesu SCU-17 Support
  • Orion KY Keyer Support
  • ClubLog Support
  • Dstar Icom Radios ID-3 and ID-5 Support
  • FSK fixes (updated)
  • PSK Reporter fixes
  • Logbook and Cluster fixes
  • Radio Control fixes
  • Icom A/B and QSX fixes
  • Line colors based on WSI in Logbook
  • ID-5100 Support
  • Updated License Manager
  • RC fix for VCP ports
  • Multiple QSO’s on a singel label
  • Make your own QSL Card
  • Alinco support DX SR8/9, DX77
  • HRD WSI Filters
  • FTDX CAT Controlled Rotors Support

Logbook of The World (LOTW)… not as difficult as you think!

I set up LOTW and it was not as hard to do as I was led to believe!  I have the TQSL’s for all 3 of my ham radio licenses dating back to the 1980’s… KA8LJO… KB8FIR… and now WT8WV… here are some helpful videos to assist you in getting it up and running fast and easy.  (I learned a lot by watching the videos before I even downloaded it!)  I will add links to LOTW at the end of this post so you can get everything you need.

http://www.arrl.org/logbook-of-the-world

N1MM Contest Logger Software

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http://n1mm.hamdocs.com/tiki-index.php

There is a new version out now, so be sure to get the latest version!  But these videos will give you the gist and get you up and running pretty fast.

The Splinter II QRP Ham Radio Kit… Impressive!

Going to have to build this little rig!  

http://breadboardradio.com/breadboardradio/Products.html

CHIRP Ham Radio Channel Programming Software

I fiddled with CHIRP for about an hour and found it relatively easy to program my two Baofeng hand held radios.  Once you get a hang of it you will find it pretty easy.   I love that you can sort your freqs by state and county repeaters and also add the NOAA weather channels.  I suggest watching this video to help you get a sense of it before you start.  It sure beats trying to manually program 125 channels!

Baofeng UV-5R and Wouxun KG-UV2D Dual Band Radios… A comparison

71kDkIpQ0YL._SL1000_

It was time to get a new 2 meter HT and I decided to get a dual band this time.  I recently purchased on Amazon two Boafeng UV-5RV2+ radios for under $70 and like them very much.  Here is the link for the Amazon deal… http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00IA9Q78W/ref=pe_385040_127541860_TE_dp_2

Here is a good video comparing the Baofeng and Wouxun Dual Banders…

I will need to add a better antenna to them but for the money they seem pretty nice.  Audio is excellent.  Programming them manually is a bit of a pain in the drain, so I downloaded the free CHIRP software and had them programmed in under an hour. Once you get a sense of the CHIRP software future changes will go smoothly.  (I’ll post another video about using CHIRP.)

Best Way to Coil Coax and Audio Cables

Any one who has EVER coiled wire, coaxial cables, audio cables or even a hank of rope knows UNCOILING it has at one time or another created a “rats nest” of tangled mess that will increase your blood pressure, makes you exceedingly cranky and often has caused Tourettes-like symptoms.  Fighting an unruly coil of coax or audio cable wastes a lot of time when setting-up a gig, a Field Day site or even coiling a power chord at home!  Having spent years working in television studios, control rooms, and other audio gigs on a daily basis, I learned early on from the engineers that there is ONE way to coil cabling… W2AEW shows that in his video!  (P.S.  Engineers can be especially grouchy if you don’t coil correctly and THEY get to untangle YOUR improperly coiled rats-nest from a previous gig tear-down as they work on an important production. Time is money.)

Radio Propagation 101 (N9LVS)

Excellent tutorial by Dan Vanevenhoven (N9LVS) on what all the numbers in a propagation report mean to amateur radio operators and their ability to broadcast every day.

K1AR Contest Tips… boosting your contest scores!

QRP 20 Meter Phone

QRP 20 Meter Phone

Understanding how serious Ham Radio contesters rack-up big numbers in their final score tallies will add to your own scores.  This is another excellent QRZ.COM article from John H. Dorr (K1AR) about Contest Operating Tips.  This fellow knows how to contest!

K1AR Contest Tips

Pre-Contest To-Do List… CHECK it out!

calendar6-300x300     2014-06-28 17.39.43

CQ Contest… CQ Contest… CQ Contest !!!

Ham radio contesting is exciting and fun to participate in regardless if you are a Rookie Contester or a Seasoned Pro-Contester!  As with any big project, proper prior planning makes all the difference in your final score.  This QRZNOW.COM article about developing a Pre-Contest Checklist will add to your QSO tally!  Click link below for the full article…

Pre-Contest Checklist – CQ WW

10 Most Popular Microphone Wiring Diagrams

HEADSET1            micdiagram2922

This is an excellent article from QRZNOW.COM showing the pin-outs for the 10 most popular microphone cables.  This QRZNOW website is a huge resource for hams everywhere.  Click article link below for full article and wiring diagrams…

10 “Most” Popular MIC Wiring Diagrams

20 Meters Ham Radio Band… HF… What can ya hear?

20 Meters Ham Radio Band is one of the most popular bands for long range (DX) communications.  It holds up in most conditions and is were a lot of exciting DX contacts OfficialSWLChannel tells us all about finding signals on the 14 MHz part of the band.

10 Meter Ham Radio Beacons… HF… What can ya hear?

10 Meter Ham Radio Beacons (28 MHz) help us know where propagation is working in our favor for communicating around the world.  OfficialSWLChannel provides another excellent video on how to take advantage of these beacons!

40 Meters Ham Radio Band… HF… What can ya hear?

OfficialSWLChannel tells us what we can expect on the exciting 40 Meters amateur radio frequencies.

80 Meters Ham Radio Band… HF… What can ya hear?

OfficialSWLChannel video about the activity on 80 Meters.

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160 Meters Ham Radio Band… HF… What can ya hear?

160 Meters is another challenging ham radio band to work.  This video tells you what listen for and what to expect.  This is another OfficialSWLChannel video.

6 Meters Ham Band… VHF… What can ya hear?

This is an interesting but challenging ham radio frequency band.  Sporadic E propagation is pretty cool but takes some effort.  Aurora activity in the upper atmosphere helps.  The Officialvhfuhfchannel does a good job on this video.

2 Meters Ham Band… VHF… What can ya hear?

K7AGE has a superb series of ham radio videos and I have learned a lot from them.  Subscribe to his YouTube Channel for information on TONS of topics about amateur radio!

10 Meters Ham Band… what can ya hear?

Anderson Power Poles (Part 2)

Anderson Power Poles For 12 Volt Ham Radio Connections

These are very handy for all sorts of your 12 volt ham radio projects!  

Will be looking for these at the next hamfest!

How To Make A CAT5 Network Cable

Recently I remodeled the attached garage into an additional room (which will include my revised ham shack) so that it became a functional area.  Before hanging the dry wall I ran both electrical circuits and a network circuit so that I could not only supply power to the whole room but also 2 circuits for my ham radio equipment and computers.  After pulling the CAT5 cables I had to terminate them for hooking up the wireless router and computers.  This video shows and explains the exact sequence of the individual multicolored CAT5 wires and the order they need to be slipped into the connectors before they are crimped.  WRITE DOWN THE WIRE COLOR CODE ORDER GIVEN IN THE VIDEO TO USE WHEN YOU ARE READY TO MAKE THE CONNECTIONS. 

GPS and APRS… A Marriage Made In The Heavens

24satellite

How GPS Works

Basic APRS – An Introduction

Automatic Packet Reporting System (APRS)

(Click link above for the ARRL APRS webpage explaining APRS)

 The Global Positioning System, or GPS, is pretty amazing and chances are, it’s playing a much greater role in your life than you realize. Anthony explains how GPS works and tells you about some pretty cool upgrades coming soon.

GPS
http://www.gps.gov/
“Official U.S. Government information about the Global Positioning System (GPS) and related topics”

GPS Modernization Video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chNQW2…

GPS is getting an $8-billion upgrade
http://articles.latimes.com/2010/may/…
“Without it, ATMs would stop spitting out cash, Wall Street could blunder billions of dollars in stock trades and clueless drivers would get lost.”

New Satellites Could Make GPS Harder to Jam
http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2012/…
“Without GPS, drones can’t fly, communications networks can’t function, and you don’t have a chance of figuring out how to get to your Aunt Sadie’s place in New Jersey. And right now, GPS is highly vulnerable because its weak signals are coming from an aging constellation of satellites.”

How GPS Receivers Work
http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/…
“Our ancestors had to go to pretty extreme measures to keep from getting lost. They erected monumental landmarks, laboriously drafted detailed maps and learned to read the stars in the night sky.”

Check out the Air Force Collaboratory:
https://collaboratory.airforce.com/

Watch More:

How Collaboration Leads To Great Ideas
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ga1_a4…

How Robots Help Search And Rescue Teams
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i1Jztu…

Voyager 1: Where To Next?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RRbG3y…

Space Weather Impacts Everyone… including amateur radio!

space weather

From the U.S. National Weather Service YouTube page… click video links below…

We rely on advanced technology for almost everything we do today. Satellite communications, GPS applications, and the electric power grid provide the backbone to our Nation’s economic vitality and national security. This technology however, is vulnerable to a threat from space — our Sun. Eruptions from the Sun can have a profound impact on society. In Boulder, Colorado NOAA space weather forecasters maintain a constant vigil on the Sun, alerting a diverse customer base when storms are imminent. Operators from many sectors will take mitigating actions to protect the critical infrastructure that we have come to depend on.

An Introduction to Space Weather and the Space Weather Prediction Center

Space Weather Impacts: Communications

Space Weather Impacts: GPS

Space Weather Impacts: Power

Radio Signal Identification (Sample Audio and Waterfall Images)

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Did you ever wonder what some of those strange radio signal beeps, boops, squeals and braps are when you tune across the radio frequencies?  Click the link below for a neat wiki page, off one of The DXZone and Sigidwiki.com website pages, that not only allows you to listen to short audio segments of them but also shows what the signal looks like in a waterfall image.

Signal Identification Guide

 

Historical Events in Amature Radio… 1894 to 1998

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This is a fun read about our amateur radio hobby from it’s infancy.  Well written factoids from The Ham Radio Files website.  Click the link below for the article…

Historical Events in Amateur Radio

RS232C DE-9 Pin Outs (M/F)

   dsub9m Male

dsub9f

Female

Again, DXZone has the information needed if you are needing to wire up an RS232 cable for an amateur radio project.  Click the link below for which pin does what!

RS232C DE-9 Pin Outs

Feed Lines… A Basic Understanding

The ARRL Website has excellent information on their website about all things amateur radio.  This article explains the basics about some of the more common feed lines in use for antenna construction and the termination to your ham radio equipment.  Check the link below…

Feed Lines… ARRL.Org

Tips on Soldering Projects

Z25_Soldering

The DXZone is another resource I can turn to for insightful articles and information.  Check out the link below for solid soldering tips and how to do a good job on your next homebrewing or kit project!

8 Awesome Tips And Tutorial Videos On Soldering

The Doublet Antenna

I have helped build and used two of these Doublet Antennas during the 2014 Field Day Contest and they worked great!  Worked many stations on CW, Phone, and PSK31.  Works great across many HF bands.  A little over 120 feet long.  WR8S (Bill Shultz), WD8WQK (Tom Graf) and I are going to make one for my ham shack as soon as I order the parts. Take a look at Ray Heffer’s explanation of the Doublet Antenna and a diagram by N4UJW below.

8010doublet

First Radio? Icom 718 HF Radio

The Icom 718 HF Ham Radio is suggested by many hams as the ideal beginner’s HF rig. The QRZ.COM website had a good forum post on best radios for beginners HF Rig For Beginners  (See reviews of the Icom 718 at the end of this post.)

Icom 718 HF Radio from the Amateur Electronic Supply (AES Website) website

Core Specifications
Receive Range: 0.030-29.999 MHz
Transmit Range: 1.800-1.999, 3.500-3.999, 7.000-7.300, 10.100-10.150, 14.000-14.350, 18.068-18.168, 21.000-21.450, 24.890-24.990, 28.000-29.700 MHz
Mode: USB, LSB, CW, RTTY (FSK), AM
Transmit Power: SSB, CW, RTTY 2-100W; AM 2-40W
Memory Channels: 101 (99 regular, 2 scan edges)The HF bands allow you to communicate over long distances covering many km even to the other side of the world. With the superior performance found in the IC-718 such as wide dvnamic range, high C/N ratio, and full duty operation you will find making these contacts easy. Experience the combination of the latest RF and digital technology, along with the size and simplified operation. You will see the IC-718 will be the most practical rig you will ever own.Front mounted loud speaker
The IC-718 has a speaker mounted on the front panel. With the speaker facing the operator, audio sounds can be clearly heard without impediment during operation. It is no longer necessary to manually increase the volume to try and capture audio sounds.

Superior basic performance
The IC-718 has 0.03-29.999999 MHz* general coverage receive capability. A 4-element system is employed for the 1st receive mixer, providing superior receive IMD, especially from in-band near-by interfering signals. A well-designed double-conversion system to help minimize image and spurious responses for better signal fidelity, is also built-in. A newly designed PLL circuit has been adopted to improve C/N ratio characteristics. The combination of the 4-element system mixer and new PLL circuit allows superior basic performance as that of a commercial grade transceiver.
*Guaranteed range: 0.5-29.999999 MHz

DSP capability*
The DSP includes the following to give you superior receiver quality in your shack, vehicle or during DX’pedition. *DSP is built in to U.S. models, but may be optional outside the U.S. Please check with your dealer.
Noise reduction:
Pulls desired AF signals from noise. Outstanding S/N ratio is achieved, providing clean audio in SSB, AM and FM.
Automatic Notch filter:
This automatically minimizes beat signals and heterodynes while preserving the receive signal. Also, the notch frequency is automatically adjusted to follow interfering beat signals – for example, reducing interference from RTTY signals during SSB operation.

Interference rejection – IF shift
To reject interference, the IC-718 has an IF shift function which shifts the center frequency of the IF passband electronically to reduce adjacent interference.

Microphone compressor
This feature compresses microphone audio input to increase average audio output level. The result is, that talk power is increased. The compression level is adjustable for your preference. This function is effective for long distance communication, or when propagation conditions are poor.

RF gain control
RF gain control is combined with the squelch control. The RF gain adjusts minimum response receiver gain, and ignores signals weaker than the pre-set level – providing pleasant stand-by, or scanning.

Ample CW features
An electronic keyer with a variable dot/dash ratio (2.8:1 to 4.8:1) control is built-in. By simply connecting a paddle, easy CW operation can be made. The CW pitch and the key speed are also variable from 300-900 Hz, 6-60 wpm, respectively. Of course, full break-in capability is available with the adjustable break-in delay.

VOX operation
A VOX (Voice operated transmission) is included with the IC-718. It provides handsfree operation by detecting audio signals from the microphone. It’ s easy! Flexible filter selection

Flexible Filter Selection
An optional IF filter can be installed into the transceiver to suit your operating preference.

High frequency stability
When the optional CR-338 HIGH STABILITY CRYSTAL UNIT is installed, you get a very high frequency stability of ±0.5 ppm.

Selectable antenna tuner
Either the optional antenna tuner unit, AT-180 or AH-4 can be used with the IC-718 to suit your installing conditions, or operating style. Of course, the AH-4 control circuit is built into the IC-718.

Simple operation
The IC-718 is equipped with a minimum number of switches and controls for superior feature selectability. The 10-key pad on the front panel for entering directly an operating frequency, or a memory channel number. The auto tuning steps function helps quick tuning is activate when turning the dial quickly. And the band stacking register is very convenient when changing operating bands.

Digital S/RF meter
Built-in multi functional digital S/RF meter indicates signal strength level while receiving, and either transmit output power, ALC level or VSWR ratio while transmitting.

Optional voice synthesizer
A clear, electronically-generated voice announces operating frequency, mode and receiving signal strength level when the optional voice synthesizer unit, UT-102, is installed.

Other features
• USB, LSB, CW, RTTY(FSK) and AM modes are built-in
• Level adjustable noise blanker
• RF attenuator and Pre-amplifier
• Variety of scanning function types
• Total 101 memory channels are available
• Hand microphone is supplied, and more…

Includes:
• Hand microphone
• DC power cable
• Spare fuse (FGB 20A)
• Spare fuse (FGB 4A)

Dim: 9.4″w x 3.75″h x 9.4″d; 8.5 lb.

Download Manual: IC-718

Download Brochure: IC-718  

Reviews of the Icom 718 from eHam.net   eHam.net reviews of the Icom 718

How Does a Multimeter Work?

Afrotechmods is a very insightful and easy to understand YouTube channel to follow on basic electronics.  Here he talks about multimeters and their usage in our ham shack.  I have several different digital and analog multimeters and their usage often depends upon the application and project.  He does other excellent videos, so check him out!

Solar Super Storm of 2012 Near Miss… Ham’s Better Be Prepared

This is why ham radio operators need to be prepared for such a massive solar event.  If the rest of the grid (power and internet) were to go down, it could take a long time for it to be repaired.  Ham radio communications might become critical in every community.  Are we prepared and proficient to aid our communities?

Link to full article… Near Miss: The Solar Superstorm of July 2012

WM2U’s PSK31 Webpage

This is BAD PSK31 signal identification... keep it clean!

This is BAD PSK31 signal identification… keep it clean!

Good article on PSK31 by WM2U that has all sorts of good information.  Also his Tip List is below.

http://www.qsl.net/wm2u/psk31.html

 WM2U’s Tip List for PSK31

  • Set sound card sampling rate to 11025Hz
  • This must be at least a 16 bit sound card.
  • No Signal observed? Check your WAVE slider is not zero.

  • Set Rx and Tx frequencies to 1000Hz.
    NOTE: This value will get you up and running but if you plan on using a filter change it to the center frequency.
  • If using LSB check the “Inverted QPSK” box.
  • Too much noise! Try using a narrow CW filter.
  • Using a Word Processor, write your buffered messages and save them as .txt files, placing em! in a folder called ‘buffers’ created in the main PSK31 folder.
    NOTE: This is NOT a form of type ahead buffer. It is simply a method to pre write ‘Standard’ messages hence saving you keyboarding time.
  • READ THE HELP FILES.
    • Your sound card output must NOT overdrive your Mic Input.
    • Do not overdrive the sound card input from the Radio.
    • Get used to the Waterfall/Phase indicators for tuning.
    • Do not use your Speech Processor.
    • Be patient. This is a new mode. You will not find all the features you are used to yet!

Who is W2AEW ?

Check out his website and all of his YouTube videos!  His bio follows…

His website can be found at http://www.qsl.net/w2aew/  

His YouTube Channel can be found at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiqd3GLTluk2s_IBt7p_LjA

intheshack_web

My name is Alan Wolke. I am an Electrical Engineer, currently working as an RF Application Engineer for Tektronix – which means I get paid to play with Spectrum Analyzers and other fun RF and high frequency stuff. As a Field Engineer, I am on the road a LOT. Fortunately, I run an FT-857D in the car, so I can be found playing radio during my trips between various customers around the Northest. Former work focused on hardware validation of read-channel circuits for hard disk drives, and also concentrated on applications support for analog, high speed, RF, and backplane/datacom/telecom circuit and integrated circuit designs for various communications and fiber optic applications to well over 10Gb/s, and involved various circuit technologies including Silicon bipolar, Silicon-Germanium HBT, CMOS, and BiCMOS processes, GaAs MESFET and HBT processes, and various 850nm and 1300nm LEDs, PIN photodiodes and Laserdiodes. Shameless self-promotion links: here are links to things I’ve done that are published on the web (at a previous company): Paper 1Paper 2Paper 3Patent (some of the Paper links are broken, since the company has since been bought out…). You can read more about me from my interview as the Featured Engineer on the EEWeb site from 2 April, 2012.

I was originally licensed as a Novice Class in the late seventies while in High School as KA2IZZ. We had an Amateur Radio Club there (Matawan Regional High School in NJ) under the direction of WA2SLK. I dropped out of the hobby when I went to college at NJIT, and then entered the workforce. Some friends at work got me interested in Amateur Radio again (N3GH, K2TW, K4MMG, W2PI), but my renewal privileges on KA2IZZ long since expired. So, I started over as a Technician with the call KC2BOG. After about a year and a half, I upgraded to Tech Plus and bought some HF equipment in September 1998. I applied for the vanity call W2AEW in September also, and received it in October 1998. I spent October working on my CW with some friendly “encouragement” from my friend and co-worker WA2NDH (now W2CSK), and upgraded to Advanced Class in November 1998. So, since my HF privileges are fairly new, I find myself working new states and countries all of the time. Great Fun!!! I frequent many of the local 2m repeaters in central NJ, and spend most of my HF time on 20m and 17m. I tested for the Extra Class license in February 2000. I passed the written test, but missed too many questions on the 20wpm code test (I did better than I thought I would though ;-). So, I became an Extra-Lite or Advanced-Plus after April 15th, 2000 anyway, HI HI!

Other interests besides the radio include MGB carsRX-8mountain-bikingNASCAR racing (go Mark Martin!), woodworking, home improvement, and TV/VCR repair (previous life) and of course, diddling around with circuits for fun.

My wife Nancy and I are busy getting settled in our new/old house. We moved in during the summer of 2009, and absolutely love the place. The shack and HF antenna went up in October 2009 – back on the air after a several year hiatus.

 

How to zero-beat WWV to check or adjust a Frequency Counter’s accuracy by W2AEW

This is another cool video by W2AEW.  He does the best job of explaining theory I have found.  His videos are excellent and his schematics and formula explanations are easy to understand.  I have exchanged messages with him and he encourages us to follow his blog and learn.  Also check out his website below!

This video shows how to zero-beat the WWV signal as a tool to adjust the frequency reference of an old frequency counter. It demonstrates the concept of zero-beat’ing a test signal against the WWV carrier. Since the WWV carrier is likely more accurate than any other frequency reference that most hobbiests and hams have in their labs, this is a useful technique. It can be used to check or adjust the 10MHz reference in the counter, if it has one, or can be used to very precisely set the output frequency of a signal generator which can then be used as a test signal for the frequency counter.

Similar techniques can be used to adjust the frequency accuracy of a ham radio’s reference. Several years ago, I wrote up a procedure that I put on my website. If can be found here:
http://www.qsl.net/w2aew/adjustrig.htm

 

Basics of RF Mixers in Radio Receivers / Mixer Tutorial / Frequency Conversion by W2AEW

This video describes the basic properties of RF mixers, in the context of using them for frequency conversion/translation such in the application of a radio receiver. The input and output signals are shown on the oscilloscope, and the spectrum of the output is also shown, illustrating the various frequency components that are produced by the mixing process. The concept of IF filtering in a receiver is also illustrated. The video does not go into the design of mixers, the different types of mixers, or how to select a mixer for a given application.

What is a dB, dBm, dBu, dBc, etc. on a Spectrum Analyzer? by W2AEW

This tutorial video gives the basics of the typical amplitude units used on a spectrum analyzer. It gives a basic description of the electronic definition of the decibel (dB), some of the properties of the dB, why it is used. It describes that the dB is a relative measurement. These relative measurements can be expressed as absolute measurements when a known reference is used/implied. This is where the terms dBm, dBu, dBmv, etc. come from. Finally, the term dBc is described. Each of the descriptions is followed with practical examples and demonstrations on an oscilloscope and spectrum analyzer.

Tektronix Oscilloscope Triggering controls and their usage by W2AEW

This video describes the Triggering controls on a typical Tektronix analog oscilloscope. Other analog scopes will typically be similar. The video presents the Trigger Level, Slope, Source, Coupling, Mode and Holdoff controls, and how each of them are used and their affect on the triggering capability of the scope.

Spectrum Analyzer Basics / Tutorial, and the Tektronix 1401A by W2AEW

I picked up a Tek 1401A Spectrum Analyzer at a hamfest recently, and it inspired me to do a video or two. This one presents a generic block diagram and tutorial of what a conventional swept spectrum analyzer is and how it works. It also shows a quick demo of the Tektronix 1401A Spectrum Analyzer Module from the mid-70’s.

Basic Spectrum Analyzer Do’s and Dont’s … by W2AEW

…or, how NOT to blow up your Spectrum Analyzer! This video covers the very basics of how to safely use your spectrum analyzer without damaging it, and how to setup the basic controls to get usable results. It is not intended to be a full tutorial on how to use a Spectrum Analyzer, just enough to allow you to use with without damaging it, and how the “Auto” coupled settings for things like the vertical Attenuator, the RBW and Sweep operate.

Measure Capacitors and Inductors with an Oscilloscope and some basic parts by W2AEW

This video shows how to measure the value of unknown capacitors and inductors using your oscilloscope and a simple pulse generator. There are many ways to do this, but this video focuses on just two basic techniques. The video was inspired by this blog post on scopejunction.com:
http://www.scopejunction.com/author.a…
The techniques are very simple, and are a good example of basic principles of RC and LC circuits. Another bonus is that it shows another use for the fast-edge pulse generator that was shown in a video I posted several days earlier on making your own basic TDR:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cP6w2…
The capacitors are measured by simply measuring the RC time constant, and the inductors are measured by making a simple LC tank circuit and measuring the resonant frequency.

Use a scope to measure the length and impedance of coax by W2AEW

This video shows one way to use a scope and function generator to measure the length of a piece of coax transmission line as well as estimate its impedance. It uses a “poor man’s TDR” type of measurement by launching a pulse into the coax and measuring how long it takes to return after being reflected by the open circuit end. This same technique can be used to determine the distance to a fault (open or short). A simple method for determining the impedance of the line is also shown.

This video touches briefly on transmission line and reflection theory, but is definitely not intended to dive deep into these topics. There are literally books written about this topic – so that won’t be covered here.

 

playwithlifeorg

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KC4LMD

Chronicling my pursuit of amateur radio’s "Worked All Neighbors" award

Casey's Place

"When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe." -- John Muir

Hackaday

Fresh hacks every day

VK4JAZ

Writings about Amateur Radio

Tactical HF

I love the smell of ozone in the morning...smells like...radio.

WB5RMG : RadioActive Blog

slightly sub-orbital testing facility

73, de N2HTT

A blog about ham radio, Linux and more...

Ham Radio Blog PD0AC

Thoughts of a Dutch radio amateur

Silver Bells Blog

Truth Appealing...

CQ de WT8WV... GraHAM's Dits & Dah's

My journey in amateur radio intrigues and hobby interests

K5UNX Ham Radio Blog

A blog dedicated to things Ham Radio related

Mountain Mists...

A pleasant journey into how I see things... big and small

playwithlifeorg

4 out of 5 dentists recommend this WordPress.com site

BG5TLA's Blog

Just another WordPress.com site

Tinkertoytech's Blog

Just another WordPress.com weblog

KC4LMD

Chronicling my pursuit of amateur radio’s "Worked All Neighbors" award

Casey's Place

"When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe." -- John Muir

Hackaday

Fresh hacks every day

VK4JAZ

Writings about Amateur Radio

Tactical HF

I love the smell of ozone in the morning...smells like...radio.

WB5RMG : RadioActive Blog

slightly sub-orbital testing facility

73, de N2HTT

A blog about ham radio, Linux and more...

Ham Radio Blog PD0AC

Thoughts of a Dutch radio amateur

Silver Bells Blog

Truth Appealing...

CQ de WT8WV... GraHAM's Dits & Dah's

My journey in amateur radio intrigues and hobby interests

K5UNX Ham Radio Blog

A blog dedicated to things Ham Radio related

Mountain Mists...

A pleasant journey into how I see things... big and small

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